Dental Emergencies

In the case of an emergency, dial 911.

In the case of a dental emergency (such as those explained below), patients should contact our office. If it is after our normal business hours, please leave a message on our answering service and we will return your call as soon as possible.

Common Emergencies:

Common Dental Emergencies:

Abscess Scroll To Top

A dental abscess is an infection that occurs around the root of a tooth or in the space between the tooth and gums. An abscess sometimes presents as a painful pimple-like swelling on your gums. If you think you may have an abscess, call us as soon as possible. A dental abscess can spread and lead to a larger and more severe infection if left untreated. Avoid foods and drinks that cause pain or sensitivity.

Bitten Lip or Tongue Scroll To Top

Clean the area gently with a damp cloth and apply pressure to the area to control any bleeding. Apply cold compresses to reduce any swelling. Go to a hospital emergency room immediately if the bleeding doesn’t stop.

Chipped or Broken Tooth Scroll To Top

Save any pieces and call us immediately. Rinse any broken pieces as well as your mouth with warm water. If there is soft tissue bleeding, put a clean piece of gauze on the area with pressure for about 10 minutes, or until the bleeding stops. Use a cold compress on the mouth, cheek, or lip near the broken tooth to keep any swelling down. Avoid foods and drinks that cause sensitivity to the tooth. Stay on a soft diet until you are able to see the dentist.

Partially Dislodged Tooth (Extrusion, Intrusion, or Lateral Luxation) Scroll To Top

This dental emergency is usually a result of trauma to the mouth. Call us right away. To relieve pain in the mean time, apply a cold compress to the outside of the mouth or cheek in the affected area. Take an over-the-counter pain reliever (such as Tylenol or Advil) if needed. Stay on a soft diet until you are able to see the dentist.

Fully Dislodged/Knocked Out Tooth (Avulsion) Scroll To Top

This dental emergency is usually a result of trauma to the mouth. Call us right away. If you can find the tooth, hold the tooth by the crown (the part of the tooth that is normally exposed above the gumline) and rinse off the root of the tooth with cold water if it is dirty. Do not scrub or remove any tissue fragments. If possible, gently insert the tooth back in its socket and hold it in place. Otherwise, put the tooth in a cup of milk, saline, or the patient’s saliva and call us as quickly as possible. DO NOT store the tooth in a cup of water. The faster you act, the better your chances of saving the tooth. Remember to bring the tooth in with you. Stay on a soft diet until you are able to see the dentist.

Lost Crown Scroll To Top

If a crown comes off, make an appointment to see us as soon as possible and bring your crown with you. If possible, slip the crown back over the tooth. Before doing so, coat the inner surface with an over-the-counter dental cement, toothpaste, or denture adhesive to help hold the crown in place. DO NOT use super glue. This is not intended to be a permanent solution, but should make the area less sensitive until you can be seen by your dentist. Avoid foods and drinks that cause sensitivity to the tooth. Stay on a soft diet until you are able to see the dentist.

Lost Filling Scroll To Top

Call us as soon as possible. Avoid foods and drinks that cause sensitivity to the tooth. Stay on a soft diet until you are able to see the dentist.

Objects Caught Between Teeth Scroll To Top

Try to gently remove the object with dental floss. Avoid cutting the gums. NEVER use a sharp instrument to remove any object that is stuck between your teeth. Call us if you are unable to dislodge the object using dental floss.

Soft-tissue Injuries Scroll To Top

Clean the area gently with a damp cloth. Apply pressure to the bleeding site with a moistened piece of gauze or tea bag. Hold in place for 15 to 20 minutes, or until the bleeding stops. Hold a cold compress outside of mouth near the affected site to control swelling. Go to a hospital emergency room immediately if the bleeding doesn’t stop. Continue to apply pressure to the area until you can be seen.

Toothache Scroll To Top

First rinse your mouth with warm water. Gently use a soft toothbrush or dental floss to remove any food or debris caught between the teeth. Apply a cold compress to the outside of the mouth near the affected area to control swelling. Take an over-the-counter pain reliever (such as Tylenol or Advil) if needed. NEVER place any painkillers directly against the gums as it may burn the gum tissue. Call us if the pain persists. Avoid foods and drinks that cause sensitivity to the tooth until you are able to see the dentist.